Skip to content

Ultimate Governance, Risk &
Compliance  (GRC) Guides

What is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)?

 

AI-powered. Integrated content.
Unique Hub & Spoke architecture.

What is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a comprehensive set of data protection laws that was adopted by the Council of the European Union and the European Parliament in April 2016. It was designed to protect the rights and freedoms of individuals with respect to the processing of personal data and to promote the free movement of personal data within the European Union. The GDPR applies to any organization that processes personal data, regardless of where they are based. This includes organizations based in the EU, as well as those outside of the EU that process the personal data of EU citizens. The GDPR applies to both controllers and processors of personal data, and sets out a number of obligations for both. The GDPR consists of 11 chapters and 99 articles. It outlines a set of aims, key definitions, fundamental principles, data subject rights, controller and processor obligations, and penalties, among other things. The GDPR aims to protect the fundamental rights and freedoms of individuals with respect to the processing of personal data. It does this by establishing rules for organizations to adhere to when processing personal data. The GDPR also promotes the free movement of personal data within the EU. The GDPR sets out a number of key definitions, including personal data, controller, processor, and data subject. Personal data is defined as any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person. A controller is the natural or legal person who determines the purposes and means of the processing of personal data. A processor is a natural or legal person who processes personal data on behalf of the controller. The data subject is the natural person to whom the personal data relates. The GDPR also outlines a number of fundamental principles, including transparency, fairness, purpose limitation, data minimization, accuracy, storage limitation, integrity and confidentiality. These principles must be taken into account when processing personal data. The GDPR also sets out a number of data subject rights, including the right to be informed, the right of access, the right to rectification, the right to erasure, the right to restrict processing, the right to data portability, the right to object, and the right not to be subject to automated decision-making. The GDPR also sets out a number of obligations for controllers and processors of personal data. Controllers must ensure that personal data is processed lawfully, fairly, and in a transparent manner. They must also ensure that personal data is accurate and up-to-date, and that it is kept secure. Processors must also take appropriate measures to ensure the security of personal data. Finally, the GDPR sets out a number of penalties for non-compliance. These can include fines of up to €20 million or 4% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year, whichever is greater. In conclusion, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a comprehensive set of data protection laws that was adopted by the Council of the European Union and the European Parliament in April 2016. It was designed to protect the rights and freedoms of individuals with respect to the processing of personal data and to promote the free movement of personal data within the European Union. The GDPR applies to any organization that processes personal data, regardless of where they are based. It outlines a set of aims, key definitions, fundamental principles, data subject rights, controller and processor obligations, and penalties, among other things. .



6clicks is powered by AI and includes all the content you need.
Our unique 6clicks Hub & Spoke architecture makes it simple to use and deploy.

logo
logo
logo
logo
logo
logo

GET STARTED TODAY